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  • The Second Miracle: the Secret Behind Germany's Economic Resilience

    04:00 p.m. - 05:00 p.m.
    02-09-2016
    Global and International Studies Building, Room 4067

    Co-sponsored by the School of Global and International Studies and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, a presentation by Erik E. Lehmann. Lehman is a full professor of Management and Organization at Augsburg University, Director of the Master Program in Global Business Management and Dean of Student Affairs. He received his doctoral degree from Rostock University and his habilitation (venia legendi) from Konstanz University. From 2004-2005 he joined the Max Planck Institute (Jena) as an assistant director. Together with Silvio Vismara (University of Bergamo/Italy), he directs the CISAlpino Institute for Comparative Studies in Europe (CCSE). Lehmann's research is focused on the links between corporate governance in family and entrepreneurial firms, innovation, public policy, education and innovation systems, financial constraints and regional and global competition.

    Contact : Sara Cockerham

    Contact Email : saraco@indiana.edu

  • Nadezhda Filimonova (Russian State Hydrometeoroloigcal University), "Arctic Geopolitics: The Russian Perspective on China’s and India’s Roles in the Far North"

    12:15 p.m. - 01:30 p.m.
    02-12-2016
    GA 4067

    In recent years development of the Arctic region has increasingly concerned both Arctic (Russia, Canada, the United States, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Norway and Iceland) and non-Arctic countries (China, India, South Korea and Singapore). The growing attention to the region reflects its scientific significance and economic potential; the Arctic offers opportunities for exploitation of hydrocarbon deposits and navigation along the Northern Sea Route (NSR). This presentation will provide an overview of the Russian and Asian states’ interests and policy in the Far North and will examine future directions for these countries to collaborate in various areas by identifying mutual interests, actors, possible challenges and effects of cooperation on the policies of these states in the Arctic region. Nadezhda Filimonova currently heads the World Meteorological Organization Relations Department at the Russian State Hydrometeorological University in St. Petersburg. In the past she has worked in Sweden at both universities and governmental agencies. She has been the recipient of numerous fellowships and awards, including most recently in 2016 the Fulbright Scholarship for Russian International Education Administrators. Her research addresses international cooperation and competition for access to resources in the Arctic with a focus on Russia’s presence in the High North. Filimonova holds two Masters Degrees: one in Political Science and International Studies from Uppsala University and the other in International Relations from St. Petersburg State University. Sponsors: REEI, School of Education. Persons who need assistance to attend this event, should contact the REEI offices at reei@indiana.edu or 812-855-7309.

    Contact :

    Contact Email : reei@indiana.edu

  • Richard J. Samuels, "Japan's Grand Strategy"

    12:00 p.m. - 01:15 p.m.
    02-12-2016
    Global and International Studies Building 1106

    As part of the “East Asia and the World” Speaker Series, Richard J. Samuels of MIT will speak on Friday, Feb. 12 regarding Japanese foreign policy. Samuels is Ford International Professor of Political Science and director of the Center for International Studies at MIT. He has been head of the MIT Political Science Department, Vice-Chair of the Committee on Japan of the National Research Council, and chair of the Japan-US Friendship Commission. His study of the political and policy consequences of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, "3:11: Disaster and Change in Japan," was published by Cornell University Press in 2013. He has also written “Securing Japan: Tokyo's Grand Strategy and the Future of East Asia,” a finalist for the Lionel Gelber Prize for the best book in international affairs. Samuels’ presentation will be held at noon on Feb. 12 in GISB Room 1106. His talk will be cosponsored by the EASC Faculty Colloquium Series.

    Contact : Adam Liff

    Contact Email : aliff@indiana.edu

  • Dr. Frances Trix (IU), "Working with Refugees on the Syrian Refugee Trail: Strategic Camps in Eastern Europe"

    12:00 p.m. - 01:30 p.m.
    02-15-2016
    GA 3067

    As winter falls, women and children compose an increasingly higher percentage of the Middle Eastern refugees on the refugee trail to Western Europe. What dangers and fears threaten refugees crossing from Turkey through Greece and the Balkans to Germany? What roles do governments, large international agencies, and local NGOs play in the refugee camps on the way? What are “strategic camps”? Who is being excluded? Dr. Trix recently returned from Macedonia, where she assisted Syrian, Iraqi, and Afghan refugees in refugee camps. She previously worked with Bosnian and Kosovar refugees from the Balkan wars of the 1990s. She has long conducted research in Muslim communities in the US, Turkey, and the Balkans. A speaker of Turkish, Albanian, colloquial Arabic, French, and some Macedonian, she has also taught, researched, and lived in Lebanon, Yemen, and Syria. She is Professor Emerita of Linguistics and Anthropology at IUB. This event is sponsored by the Institute for European Studies, the Russian and East European Institute, and the Center for the Study of the Middle East.

    Contact :

    Contact Email : reei@indiana.edu

  • Chinese Tidings: Integration, Innovation, and Development of Chinese Cultural Tourism

    06:00 p.m. - 07:00 p.m.
    02-16-2016
    Global and International Studies Building, Room 1118

    Presentation by Chunyu Yang. Chinese Tidings is an annual series of lectures presented entirely in Chinese. Offered to stimulate discussion on a range of topics while fostering cultural literacy and language skills, the series is open to native speakers of Chinese, students of the language, and even those with no proficiency, since simultaneous summary translations are provided through the lectures by Flagship students. Chinese Tidings is sponsored by IU's Chinese Flagship Center to increase opportunities for authentic interaction in Chinese.

    Contact : Marissa Fox

    Contact Email : foxml@indiana.edu

  • EASC Colloquium Series - "Modern Korean politics or Korean Politics and Press"

    12:00 p.m. - 01:15 p.m.
    02-19-2016
    Global and International Studies Building, Room 2067

    EASC Visiting Scholar Yun Hae Ha will be presenting on Modern Korean Politics and Press as part of the EASC Colloquium Series.

    Contact :

    Contact Email : eascprog@indiana.edu

  • Islamic Studies Program Lecture: Kim Hodong (Seoul National University) "Was ’Da Yuan’ a Chinese Dynaty? A Mongol Perspective"

    04:00 p.m. - 05:30 p.m.
    02-24-2016
    IMU Distinguished Alumni Room

    Please join the Islamic Studies Program in welcoming Prof. Kim Hodong (Seoul National University) to Indiana University. Kim Hodong is a professor of Central Asian history and the director of the Center for Central Eurasian Studies at Seoul National University. During the 2015-16 academic year, he is a visiting scholar in the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. Abstract: In 1271 Qubilai, the supreme ruler of the Mongol empire, proclaimed ‘Da Yuan’ as the new name of his empire, and the next year he ordered that his new capital be called ‘Da Du.’ This series of actions has led scholars to believe that Qubilai transformed the nomadic Mongol empire into a Chinese style dynasty with a new center and a new dynastic name. This lecture will question our traditional view about the formation of the ‘Yuan Dynasty’ by examining the meaning of ‘Da Yuan’ and its relation to the Mongol name of the empire, ‘Yeke Mongol Ulus.’ This lecture will show how our traditional view of the Mongol empire was deeply influenced, even distorted, by the Chinese viewpoint, and it will introduce the possibility of reappraising the history of the Mongol empire from a Mongol perspective. This talk is co-sponsored by the Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures and by the Inner Asian & Uralic National Resource Center. This event is free and open to the public.

    Contact : Islamic Studies Program

    Contact Email : islmprog@indiana.edu

  • Center on American and Global Security presents The New Cold War? Panel

    06:30 p.m. - 08:00 p.m.
    02-29-2016
    Global and International Studies Building (GISB) Atrium

    The Center on American and Global Security (CAGS) will be hosting The New Cold War? Panel. This event is graciously co-sponsored with the Institute for European Studies (EURO) and the Russian & Eastern European Institute (REEI). For the event, our panelists will be: Professor Jason Davidson from the University of Mary Washington to consider the European perspective in light of the growing tensions with the region. Professor Sean Kay from Ohio Wesleyan University to explore the American foreign policy aspect. Professor Rajan Menon from the City College of New York to elaborate on the Russian foreign policy considerations Dean Lee Feinstein of the School of Global and International Studies will chair the panel, and Professor Dina Spechlerfrom the Department of Political Science will commentate.

    Contact : Brea Tessa Bailey, Associate Director of CAGS

    Contact Email : baileybt@indiana.edu

  • Globalization and Mass Politics: Retaining the Room to Maneuver

    12:00 p.m. - 01:00 p.m.
    03-01-2016
    GISB 3067

    Globalization and Mass Politics: Retaining the Room to Maneuver

    Contact : Deb Hutton

    Contact Email : huttond@iu.edu

  • Access & Control: Resources and Technology in the Global South

    Times TBD
    03-03-2016
    Location TBD

    The graduate student conference presented by the Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, March 3-5th, sponsored by the CLACS graduate student association. This theme of this year's conference, ACCESS and CONTROL: Resources and Technology in the Global South, is explicitly multidisciplinary and encourages participants to expose past and present challenges that have influenced access to resources and technology throughout the Global South from both a local and state perspective. Within this theme, we invite graduate students from diverse and professional backgrounds to submit abstracts exploring: South to South idea exchange; diasporic communities and information access; movement of people and resources across national borders; diversity and access within multicultural communities; state surveillance and community relations; weaponry, borders, and population control; trends in health care informatics and medicine; challenges for infrastructure development and maintenance; and current media trends. Other abstracts relating to the theme will also be considered.

    Contact :

    Contact Email : clacs@indiana.edu

  • EASC Colloquium Series - "The U.S./South Korea/North Korea: Is Three a Crowd?"

    12:00 p.m. - 01:15 p.m.
    03-04-2016
    Global and International Studies Building, Room 2067

    Mark Minton, the former United States Ambassador to Mongolia and current IU Faculty member, will be presenting his talk "The U.S./South Korea/North Korea: Is Three a Crowd?"

    Contact :

    Contact Email : eascprog@indiana.edu

  • Chinese Tidings: Using Social Media to Promote Intercultural Communication

    06:00 p.m. - 07:00 p.m.
    03-08-2016
    Global and International Studies Building, Room 1118

    Presentation by Yingli Zhou. Chinese Tidings is an annual series of lectures presented entirely in Chinese. Offered to stimulate discussion on a range of topics while fostering cultural literacy and language skills, the series is open to native speakers of Chinese, students of the language, and even those with no proficiency, since simultaneous summary translations are provided through the lectures by Flagship students. Chinese Tidings is sponsored by IU's Chinese Flagship Center to increase opportunities for authentic interaction in Chinese.

    Contact : Marissa Fox

    Contact Email : foxml@indiana.edu

  • Securi-Tea with the Center on American and Global Security

    04:00 p.m. - 05:00 p.m.
    03-09-2016
    Global and International Studies Building (GISB) 1060

    Join the Center on American and Global Security for a casual conversation of the day’s current security and international affairs issues over a cup of coffee or tea. Come and discuss, learn more about our Center, and meet with other students and faculty as we explore pressing security matters at hand. Drop in at the Global and International Studies Building, Room 1060 from 4 pm to 5 pm on Wednesday, March 9th to meet the team, discuss the news, and enjoy some joe. We will be providing coffee, tea, and cookies! This session's topic focuses on "East Asia: A New Cold War or An Asia-Pacific Community?" for which we will be joined by Mark Minton, a former U.S. ambassador to Mongolia and the current president of the Korea Society.

    Contact : Brea Tessa Bailey, Associate Director of CAGS

    Contact Email : baileybt@indiana.edu

  • EASC Colloquium Series - "Performing Mind, Writing MEditation: Dogen's Fukanzazengi as Zen Calligraphy."

    12:00 p.m. - 01:15 p.m.
    03-11-2016
    Global and International Studies Building, Room 2067

    Professor Charlotte Eubanks (Penn State) will present her paper as part of the Spring 2016 EASC Colloquium Series. This talk will focus on the manuscript of Zen master Dōgen’s (1200-1253) Universally Recommended Instructions for Zazen (Fukanzazengi). Most analyses of Dōgen’s text have focused on its use and adaptation of Chinese source material, its place in the foundation of the new school of Sōtō Zen in Japan, and the ramifications of its doctrinal assertions for our understandings of the development of Japanese religious history. Drawing attention, instead, to the material, aesthetic, art historical and performative qualities of the text foregrounds, instead, the ways in which the visual and material qualities of this Buddhist artifact are closely intertwined with its efficacy as a religious object. In pursuing this line of analysis, this article participates in the broader ritual turn in Buddhist studies. Through an extended visual analysis of Dōgen’s calligraphy, Professor Eubanks proposes two interventions into our current understandings of Zen calligraphy. The first has to do with definition and scope: She aims to redefine the qualities of Zen calligraphy to include deliberate, erect, stable, legible characters that are well-paired with the paper’s underlying imagery, thus extending our vocabulary of visual aesthetics beyond the spontaneous and splashy forms of composition that are typically exhibited under the sign of “Zen calligraphy.” The second intervention has to do with the materiality of the text, the very particular things that this manuscript version of Fukanzazengi performs in and through its physical substantiation. Taking a sociological approach to the material text, Professor Eubanks will argue that the manuscript does precisely what it asks its readers to do: it sits calmly, evenly, at poised attention in a real world field of objects. The brushstrokes, and the entire aesthetic layout of the manuscript, enact seated meditation.

    Contact :

    Contact Email : eascprog@indiana.edu

  • Terje Østebø (Univ. of Florida), “Islamic Reformism as Network of Meaning: The Intellectualist Movement in Ethiopia”

    04:00 p.m. - 05:30 p.m.
    03-22-2016
    Global and International Studies Building 2067

    Please join the Islamic Studies Program in welcoming Professor Terje Østebø to Indiana University. Terje Østebø received his PhD in the History of Religion from Stockholm University, and is currently the director of the Center for Global Islamic Studies, and associate professor at the Center for African Studies and the Department of Religion, University of Florida – as well as a senior researcher (part-time) at the International Law and Policy Institute, an independent, private research institute in Oslo, Norway. His research interests are Islam in contemporary Ethiopia, Islam, politics, and Islamic reformism in Ethiopia and the Horn of Africa, as well as Salafism in Africa. He has lived in Ethiopia for 6 years, and has extensive field-research experience. Recent publications include Muslim Ethiopia: The Christian Legacy, Identity Politics, and Islamic Reformism (co-edited with Patrick Desplat), (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2013); Localising Salafism: Religious Change among Oromo Muslims in Bale, Ethiopia (Brill, 2012); “The revenge of the Jinn: Salafism and Perceptions of Change in Contemporary Bale (Ethiopia)” in Contemporary Islam, 8, 1 (2014); “Islam and State Relations in Ethiopia: From Containment to the Production of a ‘Governmental Islam’” in Journal of the American Academy of Religion, 81, 3 (2013); “Revolutionary Democracy and Religious Plurality: Islam and Christianity in Post-Derg Ethiopia” in Journal of East African Studies, 5, 2 (2011); “Local Reformers and the Search for Change: The Emergence of Salafism in Bale, Ethiopia” in Africa, 81, 4 (2011); and Islamism in the Horn of Africa: Assessing Ideology, Actors, and Objectives, International Law and Policy Institute Report (2010). Abstract: This talk provides insights into the highly diverse and ambiguous phenomenon of Islamic reformism. With the so-called Intellectualist movement in Ethiopia as a case in point, I discuss a kind of reformism that often escapes analysts’ attention, and argue that the movement’s informal character points to an important trend among many contemporary religious reform movements: their appearance as social networks and the processual character of reform itself. Applying the concept of network of meaning, the talk emphasizes reform movements as venues for learning, for ideological production, and for the creation of new subjects. This means that they are more than instruments for direct action, but that they are fields for symbolic exchange and self-reflexive relationships engagement, which in turn constitute processes for the realization of alternative behavior and for the mobilization of action. This event is co-sponsored by the African Studies Program and the Department of Religious Studies. This event is free and open to the public.

    Contact : Islamic Studies Program

    Contact Email : islmprog@indiana.edu

  • Guardians of the Law? The German Prosecutorial Services

    04:00 p.m. - 05:30 p.m.
    03-22-2016
    The Poynter Center, 618 E. Third Street

    German lawyers long held the reputation of "the most objective prosecutors in the world,” thanks in part to a system that positioned them to function very differently from the adversarial “gamesmanship” associated with American prosecution. But the introduction of charge-bargaining has opened the door to criticism. Professor Boyne will discuss her recent book, The German Prosecution Service: Guardians of the Law? (Springer 2014), a comprehensive ethnographic study that uses both interviews and quantitative data to take readers behind the closed doors where prosecutors discuss case decisions. The book explores the factors that shape prosecutorial discretion in Germany's civil law system and argues that organizational and political factors shape prosecutorial decision-making. About the speaker: Shawn Boyne joined the IU McKinney School of Law faculty in the summer of 2008 and currently teaches courses in cybercrime, criminal law, criminal procedure, and national security law. Prior to joining IU she was a DAAD Post-doctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute of Foreign and International Criminal Law in Freiburg, Germany, as well as a graduate fellow with the Institute for Legal Studies at the University of Wisconsin Law School. She has also been a visiting fellow with the Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studies. Early in her career, Professor Boyne served as a senior trial prosecutor for the State of New Mexico, specializing in the prosecution of child sexual abuse and domestic violence cases. She worked for several years as a defense attorney and served on the boards of several non-profit organizations dedicated to protecting the rights of children. Professor Boyne’s research interests span the intersection of the fields of criminal law, politics, and culture.

    Contact : The Poynter Center

    Contact Email : eayoung@indiana.edu

  • ("East Asia and the World" Series): Dr. Sheila Smith: "Intimate Rivals: Japanese Domestic Politics & Rising China"

    04:00 p.m. - 05:30 p.m.
    03-23-2016
    IMU State Room East

    No country feels China's rise more deeply than Japan. On March 23 at 4:00pm, Council on Foreign Relations Senior Fellow Sheila A. Smith will discuss her new book, "Intimate Rivals: Japanese Domestic Politics and a Rising China." Smith explores the policy issues testing the Japanese government as it tries to navigate its relationship with an advancing China through intricate case studies of visits by politicians to the Yasukuni Shrine, conflicts at the East China Sea boundary, concerns about food safety, and strategies of island defense.

    Contact :

    Contact Email : aliff@indiana.edu

  • EASC Colloquium Series - “The Age of the Crowd: Folk Performance and the Politics of Culture in Early Medieval Japan”

    12:00 p.m. - 01:15 p.m.
    03-25-2016
    Global and International Studies Building, Room 2067

    Ashton Lazarus (Harper-Schmidt Fellow, Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts, University of Chicago)will present his paper “The Age of the Crowd: Folk Performance and the Politics of Culture in Early Medieval Japan” as part of the EASC Colloquium Series. This talk traces the rise of folk performance in the early medieval period (eleventh and twelfth centuries), arguing that it constitutes a new mode of cultural activity that would influence later medieval arts including the noh theater and linked verse (renga). As a category, folk performance spans several different forms: songs and dances associated with wet-rice agriculture (dengaku), urban street theater (sarugaku), popular songs (imayō), and puppetry (kugutsu) put on by nomadic troupes. Considered together, these forms show how socially peripheral performance cultures, in which the troupe or the crowd was often the basic organizational unit, impacted the functioning of the central court. Frequent performances of dengaku and sarugaku on the streets of the capital exposed literate elites to hitherto unfamiliar practices, prompting the momentary collapse of class boundaries and cultural hierarchies as elites participated. The performances also interrupted, and in some cases threatened, the political and ritualistic functions of the state, leading to crises of containment. The appearance of a robust culture of folk performance hence emphasizes how far the early-medieval polity, with its countless political factions, had drifted from the highly centralized Chinese-style state (ritsuryō kokka) of the seventh and eighth centuries. That folk performance came to occupy the same spaces as nobles and aristocrats demonstrates the ability of low-ranking social actors to attain a centrality that was not only symbolic but also real.

    Contact :

    Contact Email : eascprog@indiana.edu

  • International Conference: ISIL and its Regional and International Implications

    Contact : The Center for the Study of the Middle East

    Contact Email : csme@indiana.edu

  • Chinese Tidings: Lifelong Learning and MOre

    06:00 p.m. - 07:00 p.m.
    04-13-2016
    Global and International Studies Building, Room 1118

    Presentation by Charles Stubin. Chinese Tidings is an annual series of lectures presented entirely in Chinese. Offered to stimulate discussion on a range of topics while fostering cultural literacy and language skills, the series is open to native speakers of Chinese, students of the language, and even those with no proficiency, since simultaneous summary translations are provided through the lectures by Flagship students. Chinese Tidings is sponsored by IU's Chinese Flagship Center to increase opportunities for authentic interaction in Chinese.

    Contact : Marissa Fox

    Contact Email : foxml@indiana.edu

  • Center on American and Global Security presents Security Speaker Series: Hal Brands: "Making the Unipolar Moment: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Rise of the Post-Cold War Order"

    04:30 p.m. - 06:00 p.m.
    04-15-2016
    Global and International Studies Building (GISB) 1060

    Join the Center on American and Global Security (CAGS) as we highlight Hal Brands in the third and final lecture for the Spring 2016 Security Speakers Series. Professor Brands is an Associate Professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University; his area expertises lie in national security, international relations, and U.S. foreign policy. His lecture for the series is entitled "Making the Unipolar Moment: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Rise of the Post-Cold War Order."

    Contact : Brea Tessa Bailey, Associate Director of CAGS

    Contact Email : baileybt@indiana.edu

  • EASC Colloquium Series - "Democracy, Socereignty, and Polic in Taiwan: An Ethnographic Reflection"

    12:00 p.m. - 01:15 p.m.
    04-22-2016
    Global and International Studies Building, Room 2067

    Jeff Martin (Assistant Professor of Anthropology, UIUC)will present his paper, "Democracy, Socereignty, and Polic in Taiwan: An Ethnographic Reflection" as part of the Spring 2016 EASC Colloquium Series. This talk traces the rise of folk performance in the early medieval period (eleventh and twelfth centuries), arguing that it constitutes a new mode of cultural activity that would influence later medieval arts including the noh theater and linked verse (renga). As a category, folk performance spans several different forms: songs and dances associated with wet-rice agriculture (dengaku), urban street theater (sarugaku), popular songs (imayō), and puppetry (kugutsu) put on by nomadic troupes. Considered together, these forms show how socially peripheral performance cultures, in which the troupe or the crowd was often the basic organizational unit, impacted the functioning of the central court. Frequent performances of dengaku and sarugaku on the streets of the capital exposed literate elites to hitherto unfamiliar practices, prompting the momentary collapse of class boundaries and cultural hierarchies as elites participated. The performances also interrupted, and in some cases threatened, the political and ritualistic functions of the state, leading to crises of containment. The appearance of a robust culture of folk performance hence emphasizes how far the early-medieval polity, with its countless political factions, had drifted from the highly centralized Chinese-style state (ritsuryō kokka) of the seventh and eighth centuries. That folk performance came to occupy the same spaces as nobles and aristocrats demonstrates the ability of low-ranking social actors to attain a centrality that was not only symbolic but also real.

    Contact :

    Contact Email : eascprog@indiana.edu