Events

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Events

  • IU Libraries SGIS Graduate Student Open House

    03:30 p.m. - 05:00 p.m
    01-18-2017
    Hazelbaker Hall (Wells Library, Scholars' Commons, Room E159)

    The IU Libraries cordially invites SGIS graduate students to an Open House. Hosted by international and area studies librarians. Touch base with SGIS friends and colleagues. Enjoy a selection of international food. No RSVPs necessary.

    Contact : Luis Gonzalez

    Contact Email : luisgonz@indiana.edu

  • International Trade, Jobs, Prices, Welfare

    04:00 p.m. - 05:15 p.m
    01-19-2017
    IMU Frangipani Room

    A panel discussion on international trade with Professors Mostafa Beshkar, Ahmad Lashkaripour, Volodymyr Lugovskyy, and Gustavo Torrens of the Department of Economics in the College of Arts and Sciences. A public reception will take place immediately after the program. [Event summary] The discussion will focus on the following questions: What role does international trade play in economic development? Who benefits and who gets hurt by international trade? Are trade agreements like NAFTA or TPP really such bad deals? What are the costs and benefits of tariffs and other trade restrictions?

    Contact : Deb Galyan

    Contact Email : dgalyan@indiana.edu

  • Symposium on Sustainable Development: Human Migration

    08:45 a.m. - 02:30 p.m
    01-20-2017
    GISB 1060

    The 2017 Symposium on Sustainable development will be a day-long discussion of what is "sustainable development" and how it can be applied to Human Migration. There are many reasons why people migrate, both voluntarily and involuntarily, and every nation on this planet has been shaped by the movement of our populations. Any member of the campus community is welcome to attend for free, so stop by when your schedule allows!

    Contact :

    Contact Email : csme@indiana.edu

  • Global Service and Peace Corps Prep Workshop

    04:00 p.m. - 05:00 p.m
    01-23-2017
    GISB 1060

    Learn about the certificate application process, how to create a global service portfolio, and what it takes to join the Peace Corps.

    Contact : Olga Kalentzidou

    Contact Email : okalentz@indiana.edu

  • Paul Losensky (CEUS & Comparative Literature): "How to Get from Minneapolis to Isfahan: Public Space and Public Poetry in the Bridges of Siah Armajani and the Pol-e Khvāju"

    04:00 p.m. - 10:30 p.m
    01-25-2017
    GISB 3067

    For the past forty years, the contemporary Iranian-American artist Siah Armajani has explored the imagery and iconography of bridges. Although his paintings, sculptures, and structures are inspired by the landscapes of the American Midwest, they have a surprising resonance with the communal uses of bridges in seventeenth-century Isfahan. On the occasion of an exhibition of Armajani’s work at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City, this illustrated lecture will examine the shared conception of the bridge as a site of public gathering and poetry that spans the capital cities of Minnesota and Safavid Iran.

    Contact : Islamic Studies

    Contact Email : islmprog@indiana.edu

  • GSPS: What Matters in Making. The challenges of sustaining livelihoods with craft for export.

    12:00 p.m. - 01:00 p.m
    01-26-2017
    GISB 3067

    Part of the Spring 2017 Global Studies Positioning Series: Art & Human Rights Featuring Mary Embry, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Apparel Merchandising Light refreshments provided Fair trade crafts promise ethical consumers a product that contributes to the livelihoods of small scale producers through higher wages and better working conditions. This talk discusses the value traditional craft producers find in making and compares it to the value sought by increasingly sophisticated consumers of traditional and ethical crafts, through looking at the traditional and non-traditional products of different craft producers in Ecuador, Guatemala, and Kenya as they target western fair trade consumers. Series abstract Art is both a product of our cultural, economic, and geopolitical environment as well as a sociopolitical agent. As such, art is an entry point to broader global issues and human struggles and accomplishments: it can celebrate and advocate for human rights, and it can be repressed, censored, or involved in the denial or absence of human rights. This spring’s Global Studies Positioning Series explores “Art and Human Rights” from an interdisciplinary and transnational perspective.

    Contact : Center for the Study of Global Change

    Contact Email : global@iu.edu

  • A Conversation about Health Care Reform

    04:00 p.m. - 05:15 p.m
    01-26-2017
    IMU Frangipani Room

    A moderated discussion with Kosali Simon, Herman B Wells Endowed Professor in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. A public reception will take place immediately after the program. The discussion will focus on the following questions: How well/badly do health insurance markets work? What is the proper role of government in these types of markets? How well/badly did the ACA do in its first few years? What can we learn from Europe about how to provide health insurance and care?

    Contact : Deb Galyan

    Contact Email : dgalyan@indiana.edu

  • Colloquium Series: "Transitionality: The US- Mexico Border as Barrier and Bridge"

    03:30 p.m. - 05:00 p.m
    01-27-2017
    Ballantine Hall 005

    Américo Paredes, a leading folklorist of his generation, was a child of the border separating and linking Mexico and the United States. His work extends this political boundary into a rich metaphor of peoples and cultures in recurring cycles of contact and conflict. What "transitionality" points to is a paradoxical reading of the border as both barrier and bridge, and as terminus and connector. John H. McDowell is Professor and Chair of the Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology, and an adjunct faculty member in Anthropology and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at IU. McDowell has published numerous articles and books, including "¡Corrido! The Living Ballad of Mexico's Western Coast" (2015), "Poetry and Violence: The Ballad Tradition of Mexico's Costa Chica" (2000), "So Wise Were Our Elders: Mythic Narratives of the Kamsá" (1994), "Sayings of the Ancestors: The Spiritual Life of the Sibundoy Indians" (1989), and "Children's Riddling" (1979).

    Contact : Michelle Melhouse

    Contact Email : mmelhous@indiana.edu

  • Burke Lecture:Bruce Cole "Boondoggle! The Struggle to Build the Eisenhower Memorial"

    04:00 p.m. - 05:00 p.m
    01-27-2017
    TBD

    Bruce Cole is a Senior Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center. His areas of expertise include the teaching of American history and civics, and private and federal cultural policy. Mr. Cole, the former Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, is the author of fourteen books and numerous articles. Under Mr. Cole’s leadership (from 2001 to 2009), the NEH launched key initiatives, including We the People, a program designed to encourage the teaching, study and understanding of American history and culture, and the Picturing America project, which uses great American art to teach our nation’s history and culture in 80,000 schools and public libraries nationwide. He also created the NEH’s Digital Humanities Initiative and Office, which made the NEH a national leader in this new frontier of humanities access and knowledge. Before taking the NEH chairmanship, Mr. Cole was Distinguished Professor of Art History and Professor of Comparative Literature at Indiana University in Bloomington. In 2008, he received the President’s Medal from the University for “excellence in service, achievement and teaching.” In 2006, Governor Mitch Daniels awarded Mr. Cole the Sagamore of the Wabash, which recognizes individuals who have brought distinction to the state of Indiana.

    Contact : Alexandra Burlingame

    Contact Email : acburlin@indiana.edu

  • Colloquium Series: "Ebola in Town: Creating Musical Connections in Liberian Communities during the 2014 Crisis in West Africa"

    03:30 p.m. - 05:00 p.m
    02-03-2017
    Ballantine Hall 005

    The Ebola hemorrhagic fever epidemic of 2014-2016 affected nearly 11,000 people in Liberia, West Africa. Of those victims, some 5,000 died. This health emergency proved to be a frightening period for people who had lived through a long period of civil war that had concluded a little over a decade earlier. Drawing on ethnographic research conducted in January and February of 2016 in Montserrado County, this lecture explores the importance of music performance and other sonic sources that provided warning, ameliorated suffering, and promoted mental health of people during the outbreak. Ruth M. Stone is Professor Emerita of Ethnomusicology and African Studies at IU. Her research has focused on temporal dimensions of musical performances among the Kpelle of Liberia, West Africa, which she details in "Let the Inside Be Sweet" (1982), and "Dried Millet Breaking" (1988). Among her publication are "Music of West Africa" (2005), and "Theory in Ethnomusicology Today" (2007). She is also the editor of the Africa volume of the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music.

    Contact : Michelle Melhouse

    Contact Email : mmelhous@indiana.edu

  • Burke Lecture: Sheila Dillon

    04:00 p.m. - 05:00 p.m
    02-10-2017
    TBD

    Professor Dillon’s research interests focus on portraiture and public sculpture and on reconstructing the statuary landscape of ancient cities and sanctuaries. Her books include The Female Portrait Statue in the Greek World (2010); Ancient Greek Portrait Sculpture: Contexts, Subjects, and Styles (2006), which was awarded the James R. Wiseman Book Award from the Archaeological Institute of America in January 2008; Roman Portrait Statuary from Aphrodisias (2006); and an edited volume A Companion to Women in the Ancient World (2012). Dillon was a member of the Aphrodisias Excavations in Turkey from 1992-2004, has worked at the Sanctuary of the Great Gods on the island of Samothrace, and now spends summers doing fieldwork in Athens. Her current projects include a history of portrait sculpture in Roman Athens, which examines the impact of Roman rule and Roman portrait styles on Athenian portraiture, and a digital mapping project of the archaeology of Athens, a collaborative endeavor centered in the Wired! Lab that involves undergraduate and graduate students at Duke and international colleagues in Athens. Professor Dillon is the Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Archaeology.

    Contact :

    Contact Email : acburlin@indiana.edu

  • Burke Lecture: Sheila Dillon

    04:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m
    02-10-2017

    Professor Dillon’s research interests focus on portraiture and public sculpture and on reconstructing the statuary landscape of ancient cities and sanctuaries. Her books include The Female Portrait Statue in the Greek World (2010); Ancient Greek Portrait Sculpture: Contexts, Subjects, and Styles (2006), which was awarded the James R. Wiseman Book Award from the Archaeological Institute of America in January 2008; Roman Portrait Statuary from Aphrodisias (2006); and an edited volume A Companion to Women in the Ancient World (2012). Dillon was a member of the Aphrodisias Excavations in Turkey from 1992-2004, has worked at the Sanctuary of the Great Gods on the island of Samothrace, and now spends summers doing fieldwork in Athens. Her current projects include a history of portrait sculpture in Roman Athens, which examines the impact of Roman rule and Roman portrait styles on Athenian portraiture, and a digital mapping project of the archaeology of Athens, a collaborative endeavor centered in the Wired! Lab that involves undergraduate and graduate students at Duke and international colleagues in Athens. Professor Dillon is the Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Archaeology.

    Contact : Alexandra Burlingame

    Contact Email : acburlin@indiana.edu

  • Dutch Movie Night: "De Helleveeg"

    06:30 p.m. - 08:30 p.m
    02-13-2017
    TBD

    "Sharp-tongued and imposing Tiny suffers from mysophobia. Her nephew Albert loves her and once he's grown up he confronts her after which all the family secrets finally come to light." -http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4601292/

    Contact :

    Contact Email : jhaitjem@indiana.edu

  • Joseph Hellweg (Florida State University): Singing the Hunters' Qur'an: Dozo Music, Literacy, and Apostasy in the Songs of Dramane Coulibaly (Northwestern Côte d'Ivoire)

    04:00 p.m. - 10:30 p.m
    02-23-2017
    GISB 2067

    Professor Hellweg's visit is principally sponsored by the Islamic Studies Program and co-sponsored by the African Studies Program, the Department of Anthropology, and the Department of Folklore & Ethnomusicology. Abstract: In the 1990s, singer Dramane Coulibaly sang the praises of initiated dozo hunters in the majority Muslim region of Northwestern Côte d'Ivoire. He provocatively called the harp that accompanied him, "the dozos' Qur'an," challenging the textual bias of Islamic Studies and throwing down a gauntlet to Salafi Muslims who condemn dozos as apostates for the sacrifices they make to their patron spirit, Manimory. This talk explores how the dozo funeral performances Dramane led with his songs entextualized his words without writing and edified the lives of Muslim dozos without Arabic, undermining staid distinctions between orality and literacy and between folk and erudite Islam.

    Contact : Islamic Studies

    Contact Email : islmprog@indiana.edu

  • IU Cinema Jorgensen Guest Filmmaker Lecture Series: Ana Lily Amirpour

    03:00 p.m. - 05:00 p.m
    02-24-2017
    IU Cinema, located at 1213 E. 7th Street, Bloomington, Indiana. We are located at the East end of the IU Auditorium building. Our main entrance is on the North side, facing the Wells Library.

    Named one of Filmmaker Magazine’s “25 New Faces of Independent Film” in 2014, Ana Lily Amirpour is an Iranian-American director, writer, producer, and actor who is most known for her feature-film debut, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, an “Iranian vampire spaghetti western” that rocked the Sundance Film Festival in 2014. Born in England and settled in Bakersfield, Calif., she attended art school at San Francisco State University and graduated from UCLA’s School of Theater, Film and Television. Amirpour has been making films since she was 12 years old: “I make films to make friends,” “It’s just me, lonely, trying to figure out how to be a human being.” Her second feature, The Bad Batch, won the Special Jury Prize at the 2016 Venice Film Festival. The “post-apocalyptic cannibal love story,” as she describes it, is “Road Warrior meets Pretty in Pink with a dope soundtrack” and opens in 2017.

    Contact : Jessica Tagg

    Contact Email : iucinema@indiana.edu

  • Burke Lecture: Stanley Abe

    04:00 p.m. - 05:00 p.m
    03-03-2017
    Fine Arts 102

    Professor Abe has published on Chinese Buddhist art, contemporary Chinese art, Asian American art, Abstract Expressionism, and the collecting of Chinese sculpture. He is now composing an account of how Chinese sculpture came into existence as a category of Fine Art during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Among his publication are: A Freer Stela Reconsidered (Feer and Sackler 2002) and Ordinary Images (Chicago 2002).

    Contact :

    Contact Email : acburlin@indiana.edu

  • Dutch Movie Night: "Knielen op een bed violen"

    06:30 p.m. - 08:30 p.m
    03-20-2017
    TBD

    "The film tells the love story between Hans (Barry Atsma) and Margje (Noortje Herlaar) - sweethearts since school. Hans grows up in a strict religious environment, with a brutal father. He runs away from home at a young age and studies horticulture. After World War II, he starts a nursery in a village in the province of Gelderland. At first, he and Margje enjoy a happy family life and boundless love for one another. They also experience problems, however, with keeping the business going. One day, Hans meets Jozef Mieras (Marcel Hensema), who talks to him about God. After Hans hears God's voice in a vision, he becomes drawn ever deeper into his faith - a faith that will now determine the course of his life, and that of his family. The rifts between the different family members become greater and greater until Hans is completely in the grip of the religious sect. Yet Margje's unconditional love for him survives, in spite of all." -http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2496758/plotsummary?ref_=tt_ov_pl

    Contact :

    Contact Email : jhaitjem@indiana.edu

  • Pancakes and Game Night

    05:30 p.m. - 07:00 p.m
    03-27-2017
    GA 3067

    Enjoy delicious Dutch "Pannenkoeken" (pancakes) and play Dutch games.

    Contact :

    Contact Email : jhaitjem@indiana.edu

  • Burke Lecture: Stanley Abe

    04:00 p.m. - 09:00 p.m
    03-31-2017

    Professor Abe has published on Chinese Buddhist art, contemporary Chinese art, Asian American art, Abstract Expressionism, and the collecting of Chinese sculpture. He is now composing an account of how Chinese sculpture came into existence as a category of Fine Art during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Among his publication are: A Freer Stela Reconsidered (Feer and Sackler 2002) and Ordinary Images (Chicago 2002).

    Contact : Alexandra Burlingame

    Contact Email : acburlin@indiana.edu